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Fig Jam Cookies (gluten free + dairy free!)

If you’re looking for a fig cookie / fig bar / fig newton recipe recipe, I’ve got you covered! This recipe is gluten free, dairy free and paleo friendly, and my husband — who is a regular dairy and gluten eater — said they are AMAZING. So, I count that as a win!

I was so bummed when the fig jam cookie recipe in Run Fast Eat Slow wasn’t gluten-free, so I set out to make my own version. Then, when I was out of sesame seeds mid-making of this, I had to improvise even more. (WHEN will I learn to check my ingredients before I start cooking or baking?!) And now, I’m not sure I’m even missing out on the original version. These are chewy, not overly sweet, filling but not heavy and so so good.

fig newton recipe  homemade fig newtons

I loooved fig newtons as a kid and these are a grown-up version and a much healthier version using real food ingredients vs. food science ingredients. They take a little time but they’re not complicated. I found making them a great way to zone out on the weekend; I’m all about baking for stress relief! I love these before an afternoon lifting session since it satisfies my sweet tooth and gives me healthy fuel for my workout. They’re also great with breakfast since they pair great with coffee. (See how they fit into my marathon training diet in tomorrow’s post!)

Fig Jam Cookies

Makes 24 cookies

Inspired by this recipe, also found in the Run Fast Eat Slow cookbook which EVERYONE should own!!!

 

Ingredients

Filling:

  • 10 ounces (about 2 cups) dried black mission figs, stems removed (I use a food scale to measure)
  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Dough:

  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1 cup blanched almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 1/3 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Step 1: get things ready

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Check to make sure you have all the ingredients. 😉

Step 2: make the fig jam filling

  • In a food processor, combine the figs, tahini, water, cinnamon and salt and puree until smooth. Scrape down the sides as necessary.

Step 3: make the dough

  • In a large bowl, combine the almond meal, almond flour, coconut flour, sesame seeds, coconut flakes and salt.
  • Place the oil in a small microwaveable bowl and heat for 30 seconds or until melted. Stir in the maple syrup and vanilla.
  • Pour the oil mixture over the almond flour mixture and combine until a dough forms. Your dough should feel stiff but not overly dry. If it’s super crumbly, add 1-2 tablespoons of water so it will hold together.

Step 4: roll out your dough

  • Divide the dough into 3 balls and sprinkle some almond flour on the counter. This helps prevent sticking as you form the cookies
  • Using your hands, press each ball into a rectangle, about 8″ x 4″. Tap your fingers in the flour or sprinkle a little more on top if things get too sticky. Be gentle!

Step 5: shape your fig mixture

  • Divide the fig jam into thirds and shape into long rectangular logs ( about 1″ wide, 1″ tall, 7″ long). This was like playing with playdough! 🙂
  • Place a log in the center of each piece of flattened dough. Use a dough scraper (or a metal spatula) to gently lift the dough off the counter, fold the dough over the fig logs to cover, like wrapping a present.
  • Use your fingers to spread the dough as needed to connect the ends and press to seal. Fold the ends up to cover as well. Your fig logs should be fully encased!

Step 7: slice & bake!

  • Using the dough scraper, slice each log into 8 cookies and lift them onto the baking sheet.
  • Bake until lightly golden, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool.
  • Store in an airtight container for up to 5-7 days. (I doubt they’ll last that long! ; ))

fig bars recipe

Get Cookin’! Here’s what you need for this recipe.

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3 Comments

  • Reply
    Kate
    at

    They are such a pain to make (but worth it) that I make a LOT and freeze them. Less tasty after being frozen but they are still good and do the trick for fuel 🙂

  • Reply
    Christine Whittington
    at

    I had to look up the difference between almond flour and almond meal. I had not realized they were different! Absolutely making these . . .

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