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Gluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies

Looking for the perfect chewy gluten-free ginger molasses cookie recipe? I got ya covered! They have juuuust enough crisp around the edges – yet are still soft and chewy. Plus, they are easy to make and are a hit even with non-gluten-free folks! No one will know that they are gluten-free, dairy-free, grain-free, and paleo-friendly.

Gluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies

Eating a gluten-free diet can be frustrating at times, but thankfully gluten-free cookies are easy to make — and in most cases, really tasty.

These flatten out more than my traditional ginger cookie recipe, but they have just as much flavor, without processed flour or butter, which makes them great for those who have dietary restrictions!

Gluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses CookiesGluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies Gluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies

 

Ingredients

This recipe yields about 24 cookies depending on the size you make. I usually use a small cookie dough scoop for about 1” balls and my cookies end up about 2” in diameter once they’re baked.

2 cups almond meal
1/2 cup coconut sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon allspice
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1.5 heaping tablespoons grated fresh ginger (I use a zester, so it’s extra fine!) or 1 tablespoon dried – see note
1/4 cup refined or unflavored coconut oil, melted (see note)
1/3 cup blackstrap molasses
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 egg

Gluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies

Since cookies always get a bad rap, let’s check out the nutritional benefits of these ingredients! (As if we needed any more excuses to eat these cookies.)

Almond meal is a courser version of almond flour (and is made from unpeeled almonds rather than peeled – or blanched – almonds). All the benefits of almonds like healthy fats, fiber, protein, magnesium, and vitamin E – are still there.

Coconut sugar is still sugar and should be used sparingly. But it should be noted that it’s not as processed and contains minor amounts of nutrients compared to regular sugar.

Cinnamon has been linked to several studies that show improvements in cholesterol and blood sugar control. Cinnamon is also known to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects.

Cloves are an amazing preventative. Cloves are enriched in antiseptic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. They’ve been known to help ease digestion, heal sore throats, and is even linked to revving up metabolism naturally.

Ginger (fresh or ground) is pretty much a superfood and even has some medicinal properties. It’s packed with tons of vitamins and minerals, and it contains antioxidants that prevent stress and damage to your body’s DNA.

Refined Coconut oil means there are fewer antioxidants and anti-inflammatory benefits in comparison to unrefined coconut oil. But the refining process strips the coconut flavor out of the oil – which is what we are going for here. If you don’t mind the coconut flavor and want to benefit from unrefined coconut oil, feel free to use it in this recipe.

Blackstrap Molasses contains a decent amount of calcium and magnesium (1 Tbsp = 8% and 10% respectively – even though it’s a byproduct of the sugar cane’s refining process. It’s also rich in B vitamins, particularly B6.

Eggs are a great source of protein, and they are packed with disease-fighting nutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin and many vitamins, minerals, and carotenoids.

Instructions

Step 1

Sift together the almond meal, sugar, spices, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl.

Step 2

Using a hand mixer, cream together the coconut oil, molasses, ginger, egg, and vanilla extract in a medium bowl.

Step 3

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and combine using a rubber spatula. It should look like wet sand.

Step 4

Cover the bowl and place it in the fridge to chill for at least an hour.*

Step 5

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and place parchment paper on two baking sheets.

Step 6

Use your hands to roll the dough into tablespoon-size balls (or use a mini cookie dough scoop) and place them on the baking sheets, about 2 inches apart.

Step 7

Bake for 10-11 minutes. Don’t overbake — they will set more as they cool!

Step 8

Move to a cooling rack until cool enough to eat. And enjoy!

Gluten-Free Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies

Recipe Notes

Coconut Oil

Refined or unflavored coconut oil is important because it doesn’t have the coconut flavor of unrefined coconut oil — and I don’t want any coconut taste in my ginger molasses cookies! Whole Foods has refined coconut oil, and Carrington Farms has unflavored Organic Coconut Cooking Oil.

Ginger

I tested both fresh ginger and powdered ginger after remembering a comment from the Great British Baking show that fresh ginger doesn’t hold up its flavor as well in baked goods. While I didn’t notice a huge difference in taste, my husband said the one with powdered ginger tasted more like traditional ginger cookies. I also found it had a slight after-kick I really like!

Cooling in fridge*

I tested one cookie batch by having it chill in the fridge for an hour and one batch chilling overnight. The flavor was the same, but the ones that chilled overnight didn’t spread out quite as much, which I preferred.

Storing & Freezing

Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days (if you don’t eat them before then!!).

If you want to freeze them, let them cool completely and then place in a freezer-safe ziplock bag. I made a double batch of these before our baby came to have on hand since I love them so much! You can eat these straight from the freezer (they stay somewhat soft!) or let them come to room temperature.

Gluten-Free Ginger Molasses Cookies

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paleo ginger molasses cookies

Gluten-Free Ginger Molasses Cookies

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  • Author: Teri from A Foodie Stays Fit
  • Prep Time: 1 hour and 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10-12 Minutes
  • Total Time: 4 minute
  • Yield: 24 cookies 1x

Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 cups almond meal
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/8 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1.5 heaping tablespoons grated fresh ginger (I use a zester so it’s extra fine!) or 1 tablespoon dried – see note
  • 1/4 cup refined or unflavored coconut oil, melted (see note)
  • 1/3 cup blackstrap molasses
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 egg


Instructions

  1. Combine the almond meal, sugar, spices, baking soda and salt in a large mixing bowl. Mix well.
  2. Combine the coconut oil, molasses, ginger, egg and vanilla extract in a small bowl. Whisk well.
  3. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and combine using a rubber spatula. It should look like wet sand.
  4. Cover the bowl and place it in the fridge to chill for at least an hour. (See notes.)
  5. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and place parchment paper on two baking sheets.
  6. Use your hands to roll the dough into tablespoon-size balls (or use a mini cookie dough scoop) and place them on the baking sheets, about 2? apart.
  7. Baked for 10-11 minutes. Don’t overbake — they will set more as they cool!
  8. Move to a cooking rack. Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days (if you don’t eat them before then!!)

Notes

  • Refined or unflavored coconut oil is important because it doesn’t have the coconut flavor of unrefined coconut oil — and I don’t want any coconut taste in my ginger molasses cookies! Whole Foods has refined coconut oil and Carrington Farms has unflavored Organic Coconut Cooking Oil.
  • I tested both fresh ginger and powdered ginger after remember a comment from the Great British Baking show that fresh ginger doesn’t hold up its flavor as well in baked goods.  While I didn’t notice a huge difference in taste but my husband said the one with powdered ginger tasted more like traditional ginger cookies. I also found it had the slight after-kick I really like!
  • I tested one batch chilling for an hour and one batch letting it chill overnight. The flavor was the same but the ones that chilled overnight didn’t spread quite as much, which I preferred.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 cookie
  • Calories: 115
  • Fat: 7.8 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 9.2 grams
  • Protein: 2.7 grams

Get Cooking!

 

 

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3 Comments

  • Reply
    cam
    at

    I added two tablespoons of matcha powder, as I love ginger green tea. Good in theory but needs some adjusting to get the chemistry (baking) right. Thanks for the recipe!

  • Reply
    Hillary | Nutrition Nut on the Run
    at

    These look so tasty! I love molasses cookies!

  • Reply
    Christine Whittington
    at

    I love these! Ginger Snaps were one of my favorites of my mother’s cookies, but she made them with white sugar, white flour, and that white vegetable shortening (you know the brand). There are even more delicious. I used the powdered ginger and they were *very* gingery. I like the addition of the black pepper. I did cheat a bit and rolled them in sparkle sugar before baking to give them a crunch. You could probably do the same with coconut sugar or large-grained turbinado sugar for the same effect. It does help to let them cool a bit before you take them off the parchment paper so they don’t fall apart. But they are tasty even if they do.

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